17 which of the following is not a reason for supporting ethical relativism? Ultimate Guide

17 which of the following is not a reason for supporting ethical relativism? Ultimate Guide

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Ethical Relativism [1]

As anthropologist Ruth Benedict illustrates in Patterns of Culture, diversity is evident even on those matters of morality where we would expect to agree:. We might suppose that in the matter of taking life all peoples would agree on condemnation
It may be the case that those are killed who steal fowl, or who cut their upper teeth first, or who are born on Wednesday. Among some peoples, a person suffers torment at having caused an accidental death, among others, it is a matter of no consequence
It may be the highest and noblest act a wise man can perform. The very tale of it, on the other hand, may be a matter for incredulous mirth, and the act itself, impossible to conceive as human possibility

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy [2]

Relativism is sometimes identified (usually by its critics) as the thesis that all points of view are equally valid. In ethics, this amounts to saying that all moralities are equally good; in epistemology it implies that all beliefs, or belief systems, are equally true
They also charge that such views are pernicious since they undermine the enterprise of trying to improve our ways of thinking.. Perhaps because relativism is associated with such views, few philosophers are willing to describe themselves as relativists
Although there are many different kinds of relativism, they all have two features in common.. moral values, beauty, knowledge, taste, or meaning) is relative to some particular framework or standpoint (e.g

Corruption and Business Ethics [3]

KovenUrban and Public Affairs, University of Louisville. – and Abby PerezAbby PerezUrban and Public Affairs, University of Louisville
Corruption may yield benefits at the personal or individual firm level, but at the societal level corruption is detrimental to aggregate growth, individual effort, and faith in institutions. Corruption, as defined by the Oxford English Dictionary, is dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in power, typically involving bribery
Rampant corruption exists when entire organizations willingly and knowingly promote actions that are injurious to workers, consumers, or society as a whole. Egregious examples include knowingly producing and selling harmful products or ignoring conditions that impair the health and safety of workers

Ethical Relativism [4]

As anthropologist Ruth Benedict illustrates in Patterns of Culture, diversity is evident even on those matters of morality where we would expect to agree:. We might suppose that in the matter of taking life all peoples would agree on condemnation
It may be the case that those are killed who steal fowl, or who cut their upper teeth first, or who are born on Wednesday. Among some peoples, a person suffers torment at having caused an accidental death, among others, it is a matter of no consequence
It may be the highest and noblest act a wise man can perform. The very tale of it, on the other hand, may be a matter for incredulous mirth, and the act itself, impossible to conceive as human possibility

Rationality, Culture, and the Construction of â•œEthical Discourseâ•š: A Comparative Perspective [5]

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Phil 251: Intro [6]

[Items in brackets not covered in 2005 course or text.]. Even though questions about ethics, social-political philosophy, aesthetics, and the meaning of life deal with different areas of philosophy, they are all issues addressed in Avalue theory.@
Ethics describes how each person=s background and upbringing affects his or her beliefs about moral issues.. The philosophical attempt of ethics to provide a standard for evaluating laws, religions, customs, and individual preferences is itself based on each philosopher=s personal values.
Ethical relativists claim that cultures ultimately share the same basic ethical principles.. Ethical relativists claim that even though cultures seem to differ on ethical standards, they ultimately share the same basic ethical principle–namely, moral goodness is that which produces happiness.

Several Types [7]

They do so as a result of interactions with individuals and social. societies each with their own cultures there are different ideas
The impact of this information when coupled with the theories of. the Existentialists and Pragmatists became quite significant in the realm
responsibility placed morality within the sphere of human decision-making.. There were no essences before existence of beings and there would

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy [8]

Moral relativism is the view that moral judgments are true or false only relative to some particular standpoint (for instance, that of a culture or a historical period) and that no standpoint is uniquely privileged over all others. It has often been associated with other claims about morality: notably, the thesis that different cultures often exhibit radically different moral values; the denial that there are universal moral values shared by every human society; and the insistence that we should refrain from passing moral judgments on beliefs and practices characteristic of cultures other than our own.
Greece, but they remained largely dormant until the 19th and 20th centuries. During this time, a number of factors converged to make moral relativism appear plausible
For some, moral relativism, which relativizes the truth of moral claims, follows logically from a broader cognitive relativism that relativizes truth in general. Many moral relativists, however, take the fact-value distinction to be fundamental

Moral Uncertainty Moral Uncertainty Another reason to believe that relativism holds true is the great difficulty one often has in knowing what is the morally right thing to do (especially in difficult [9]

Get 5 free video unlocks on our app with code GOMOBILE. Reasons Supporting Ethical Relativism – Moral Uncertainty
We are often unsure of what is best to do in a particular case.. Moreover, every person has a unique subjective viewpoint that he or she brings to judging moral matters
A relativist might generalize from this point and conclude that all moral judgments are simply personal and subjective viewpoints.. The view that it is difficult or impossible to know something is called skepticism

PHIL quiz answers [10]

Question 1 1 / 1 point Which of the following is NOT a claim that Simon Eassom makes about morality in his article:. For an action to be a moral (or immoral) action, it must be performed by a human ‘agent’ For an action to be a moral (or immoral) action, the agent who performs it must be able to reflect about whether the action is moral or immoral
For an action to be a moral (or immoral) action, the agent must be free to perform the action or to refrain from performing it.. He does make claim B, which on a quick reading may look like the same thing, but in fact is not
This is quite plausible since otherwise it seems we would not be able to be held responsible for acts we carelessly performed without thinking them through.. Question 2 1 / 1 point Based on the discussion in the course notes, which of the following would constitute an investigation into normative ethics?

Multiple Choice Questions [11]

parents believed they should be their child’s play partner. teaching a child to pursue his or her own interests
women engaged infants in more rough n tumble play than most men did. parents believed one important role was for them to be their infant’s play partner
culture helps us navigate and make sense of our social worlds. a parent teaching a child appropriate ways to address an elder

The Challenge of Cultural Relativism [12]

Adapted from The Elements of Moral Philosophy by James Rachels, Chapter 2, pp. Reprinted by permission of the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
2.1 How Different Cultures Have Different Moral Codes. This story, recounted by Herodotus in his History illustrates a recurring theme in the literature of social science: Different cultures have different moral codes
Should we eat the bodies of the dead or burn them? If you were a Greek, one answer would seem obviously correct; but if you were a Callatian, the opposite would seem equally certain.. isolated settlements scattered mostly along the northern fringes of North

Ethical relativism | Philosophy, Morality & Cultural Values [13]

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.. ethical relativism, the doctrine that there are no absolute truths in ethics and that what is morally right or wrong varies from person to person or from society to society.
But no set of social customs, Herodotus said, is really better or worse than any other. Some contemporary sociologists and anthropologists have argued along similar lines that morality, because it is a social product, develops differently within different cultures
Thus, according to these researchers, if practices such as polygamy or infanticide are considered right within a society, then they are right “for that society”; and if the same practices are considered wrong within a different society, then those practices are wrong for that society. There is no such thing as what is “really” right, apart from these social codes, for there is no culture-neutral standard to which we can appeal to determine which society’s view is correct

Who is (not) afraid of (cultural) relativism? [14]

– 1 I am here using Rawls’ expression (Rawls, 1996) without however endorsing his brand of ‘political (…). – 2 The notion, question and problem of ‘tolerance’ will be, as can be expected, at the center of my r (…)
1As the world grows increasingly inter-connected and inter-dependent, and as we progressively come to recognize and draw the ‘consequences of cultural complexity’ (Chokr, 2006a, 2007a) that such a world entails and reveals, one could have expected to see a higher degree of ‘moral convergence’ between members of various cultures, or at least, a more substantial “overlapping consensus”1. Similarly, one could have expected the “cosmopolitan outlook” (that Kant, and long before him the Stoics talked about) and its underlying “moral universalisme”, to have gained more ground and become, if not widely accepted, at least more widely tolerated2
As a result, we have been witnessing in recent years repeated affirmations of cultural distinctiveness and national identity, and vehement celebrations of provincialism, parochialism, particularism, sectarianism, nationalism, and fundamentalisms of various kinds –religious and secular. Needless to say, the specter of “cultural relativism” is writ large in all these affirmations and celebrations3

Terrorism Undermines the Credibility of Moral Relativism [15]

The following paper was presented at the 2016 Telos Conference, held on January 16–17, 2016, in New York City. For additional details about upcoming conferences and events, please visit the Telos-Paul Piccone Institute website.
By “moral relativism,” I understand a normative view that explains people’s incommensurable moral judgments based on their subjective preferences or on different action-guiding contexts. Moral relativists deny that value judgments can be universally justified
That is, these judgments are neither true nor false, nor right or wrong for everyone. For some moral relativists even to raise the possibility of moral disagreement across different cultures or communities would be simply moot.[1]

Relativism (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) [16]

Relativism, roughly put, is the view that truth and falsity, right and wrong, standards of reasoning, and procedures of justification are products of differing conventions and frameworks of assessment and that their authority is confined to the context giving rise to them. More precisely, “relativism” covers views which maintain that—at a high level of abstraction—at least some class of things have the properties they have (e.g., beautiful, morally good, epistemically justified) not simpliciter, but only relative to a given framework of assessment (e.g., local cultural norms, individual standards), and correspondingly, that the truth of claims attributing these properties holds only once the relevant framework of assessment is specified or supplied
Relativism has been, in its various guises, both one of the most popular and most reviled philosophical doctrines of our time. Defenders see it as a harbinger of tolerance and the only ethical and epistemic stance worthy of the open-minded and tolerant
Debates about relativism permeate the whole spectrum of philosophical sub-disciplines. From ethics to epistemology, science to religion, political theory to ontology, theories of meaning and even logic, philosophy has felt the need to respond to this heady and seemingly subversive idea

Ethical Relativism [17]

descriptive view that different groups of people have different. moral standards for evaluating acts as right or wrong.
or observational conclusion–even so; the view is somewhat. For example, different groups might have the same basic moral
(If we take the principle of the greatest good for the. greatest number as an instance, then this utilitarian principle could be instantiated

which of the following is not a reason for supporting ethical relativism?
17 which of the following is not a reason for supporting ethical relativism? Ultimate Guide

Sources

  1. https://www.scu.edu/ethics/ethics-resources/ethical-decision-making/ethical-relativism/#:~:text=Ethical%20relativism%20reminds%20us%20that,beliefs%20and%20values%20we%20hold.
  2. https://iep.utm.edu/relativi/#:~:text=In%20contemporary%20philosophy%2C%20the%20most,cognitive%20relativism%2C%20and%20aesthetic%20relativism.
  3. https://oxfordre.com/business/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780190224851.001.0001/acrefore-9780190224851-e-110?rskey=wzgtUD&result=3
  4. https://www.scu.edu/ethics/ethics-resources/ethical-decision-making/ethical-relativism/
  5. https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/188136359.pdf
  6. http://people.tamu.edu/~sdaniel/quests7.htm
  7. https://www.qcc.cuny.edu/socialsciences/ppecorino/ETHICS_TEXT/Chapter_3_Relativism/Relativism_Types.htm
  8. https://iep.utm.edu/moral-re/
  9. https://www.numerade.com/ask/question/7reasons-supporting-ethical-relativism-moral-uncertainty-moral-uncertainty-another-reason-to-believe-that-relativism-holds-true-is-the-great-difficulty-one-often-has-in-knowing-what-is-the-m-29183/
  10. https://www.studocu.com/en-ca/document/memorial-university-of-newfoundland/health-ethics/phil-quiz-answers/10398654
  11. https://global.oup.com/us/companion.websites/9780199343805/bank/ch1/mcq/
  12. https://faculty.uca.edu/rnovy/Rachels–Cultural%20Relativism.htm
  13. https://www.britannica.com/topic/ethical-relativism
  14. https://journals.openedition.org/traces/401
  15. https://www.telospress.com/terrorism-undermines-the-credibility-of-moral-relativism/
  16. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/relativism/
  17. https://philosophy.lander.edu/ethics/relativism.html
  18 which is part of the theory of evolution by natural selection? Advanced Guide

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