13 which conclusion can be drawn about the second punic war from the information in the map? Quick Guide

13 which conclusion can be drawn about the second punic war from the information in the map? Quick Guide

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End of the Second Punic War — Never Such Innocence [1]

In 203 BCE, the Second Punic War appeared to be at an end. Rome had defeated Carthginian military efforts in Sicily, driven Carthage’s remaining forces out of Spain, and won key victories at Utica – close to Carthage itself
However, this decision was abruptly reversed and Carthage recalled all of its armies to home territory, for a final stand against the Romans. The armies still campaigning in Italy led by Hannibal and Mago returned from Italy to North Africa, and Hannibal was made commander of the whole Carthaginian force.
After a huge defeat at the Battle of Zama, Carthage surrendered to Rome. The terms of peace were significantly more strict than after the First Punic War

Punic Wars | Summary, Causes, Battles, & Maps [2]

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.. – Battle of Cannae Battle of Ilipa Battle of Zama Battle of Trasimene Battle of the Trebbia River
The origin of these conflicts is to be found in the position which Rome acquired, about 275 bce, as leader and protector of all Italy. The attendant new obligation to safeguard the peninsula against foreign interference made it necessary not to allow the neighbouring island of Sicily to fall into the hands of a strong and expansive power
The proximate cause of the first outbreak was a crisis in the city of Messana (Messina), commanding the straits between Italy and Sicily. The Mamertini, a band of Campanian mercenaries, had forcibly established themselves within the town and were being hard pressed in 264 by Hieron II of Syracuse

Punic Wars: Definition, Scipio & Carthage [3]

The three Punic Wars between Carthage and Rome took place over nearly a century, beginning in 264 B.C. and ending in Roman victory with the destruction of Carthage in 146 B.C
The Second Punic War saw Roman troops, led by Scipio Africanus, defeat Hannibal after his stunning invasion of Italy. In the Third Punic War, the Romans destroyed the city of Carthage in 146 B.C., turning North Africa into yet another province of the all-powerful Roman Empire.
(The word “Punic,” later the name for the series of wars between Carthage and Rome, was derived from the Latin word for Phoenician.). By 265 B.C., Carthage was the wealthiest and most advanced city in the region, as well as its leading naval power

Punic Wars | Summary, Causes, Battles, & Maps [4]

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.. – Battle of Cannae Battle of Ilipa Battle of Zama Battle of Trasimene Battle of the Trebbia River
The origin of these conflicts is to be found in the position which Rome acquired, about 275 bce, as leader and protector of all Italy. The attendant new obligation to safeguard the peninsula against foreign interference made it necessary not to allow the neighbouring island of Sicily to fall into the hands of a strong and expansive power
The proximate cause of the first outbreak was a crisis in the city of Messana (Messina), commanding the straits between Italy and Sicily. The Mamertini, a band of Campanian mercenaries, had forcibly established themselves within the town and were being hard pressed in 264 by Hieron II of Syracuse

Second Punic War [5]

The Second Punic War (218 to 201 BC) was the second of three wars fought between Carthage and Rome, the two main powers of the western Mediterranean in the 3rd century BC. For 17 years the two states struggled for supremacy, primarily in Italy and Iberia, but also on the islands of Sicily and Sardinia and, towards the end of the war, in North Africa
Macedonia, Syracuse and several Numidian kingdoms were drawn into the fighting, and Iberian and Gallic forces fought on both sides. There were three main military theatres during the war: Italy, where Hannibal defeated the Roman legions repeatedly, with occasional subsidiary campaigns in Sicily, Sardinia and Greece; Iberia, where Hasdrubal, a younger brother of Hannibal, defended the Carthaginian colonial cities with mixed success before moving into Italy; and Africa, where Rome finally won the war.
After the war Carthage expanded its holdings in Iberia where in 219 BC a Carthaginian army under Hannibal besieged, captured and sacked the pro-Roman city of Saguntum. In early 218 BC Rome declared war on Carthage, beginning the Second Punic War

Rome, Carthage, and Numidia: Diplomatic Favouritism before the Third Punic War [6]

Rome, Carthage, and Numidia: Diplomatic Favouritism before the Third Punic War. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 12 November 2018
Polybius’ suggestion that Rome consistently decided against Carthage in territorial disputes with Numidia in the aftermath of the Second Punic War (Polyb. 31.21.5-6) has often been taken up in explanations of the origins of the Third Punic War
This paper, however, argues that the results of Roman arbitration between Carthage and Numidia do not show a consistent policy intended to undermine Carthage. Rather, Rome sought to maintain the territorial division which was imposed at the end of the Second Punic War throughout the inter-war period; several of its decisions were actually in favour of Carthage

Punic Wars: Definition, Scipio & Carthage [7]

The three Punic Wars between Carthage and Rome took place over nearly a century, beginning in 264 B.C. and ending in Roman victory with the destruction of Carthage in 146 B.C
The Second Punic War saw Roman troops, led by Scipio Africanus, defeat Hannibal after his stunning invasion of Italy. In the Third Punic War, the Romans destroyed the city of Carthage in 146 B.C., turning North Africa into yet another province of the all-powerful Roman Empire.
(The word “Punic,” later the name for the series of wars between Carthage and Rome, was derived from the Latin word for Phoenician.). By 265 B.C., Carthage was the wealthiest and most advanced city in the region, as well as its leading naval power

Second Punic War [8]

After the Battle of Trebia, there was shock when news of the defeat reached Rome, but this calmed once Sempronius arrived, to preside over the consular elections in the usual manner. The consuls-elect recruited further legions, both Roman and from Rome’s Latin allies; reinforced Sardinia and Sicily against the possibility of Carthaginian raids or invasion; placed garrisons at Tarentum and other places for similar reasons; built a fleet of 60 quinqueremes; and established supply depots at Ariminum and Arretium in preparation for marching north later in the year
One was stationed at Arretium and one on the Adriatic coast; they would be able to block Hannibal’s possible advance into central Italy and be well positioned to move north to operate in Cisalpine Gaul.. The following spring the Romans positioned two armies, one on each side of the Apennines, but were surprised when the Carthaginians crossed the mountains by a difficult but unguarded route
Flaminius, in charge of the nearest Roman army, set off in pursuit. Hannibal arranged an ambush on the north shore of Lake Trasimene and trapped the Romans, killing or capturing all 25,000 of them

Triumph in DefeatMilitary Loss and the Roman Republic [9]

2 Costs and Benefits: Winning the Second Punic WarGet access. This chapter discusses Romans’ experience of the Second Punic War (218–202 B.C.E.)
The chapter then explores the strategies, both in the field, and, as is more emphasized, at Rome, that allowed the Romans to continue the prosecution of the war until its eventual but by no means inevitable conclusion. In manning the legions and the fleet, funding the war, propitiating the gods, and addressing the concerns of its allies, the Romans showed themselves willing to go to desperate measures rather than concede in what was—importantly—not a fight to the death.
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Metaurus: The Most Important Battle of the Second Punic War [10]

To browse Academia.edu and the wider internet faster and more securely, please take a few seconds to upgrade your browser.. Ancient Warfare Magazine Vol III.2 Sept 2009The other Invader over the Alps
Despite the vast amount of modern research concerning the Second Punic War, the role in which Roman fleets played has been largely ignored. Instead, nearly all studies focus on the large-scale infantry engagements featuring Hannibal the Carthaginian general versus the leaders of the Roman Republic
An analysis of ancient ships and warfare strategies reveals that there were many limitations which hindered the ability of a fleet from operating along coastlines lacking friendly port cities. Due to a combination of geography, strategy, and success in battle Rome was consistently able to exploit these limitations at Carthaginian expense

Between Rome and Carthage: Southern Italy during the Second Punic War – Bryn Mawr Classical Review [11]

Michael Fronda’s excellent book is the first modern monograph in English on Rome’s southern Italian allies in the Second Punic War. Fronda’s fresh and modern approach to the war’s diplomatic arena, which both incorporates material and numismatic evidence alongside written sources and situates events in their historical context, offers much more than its subtitle suggests
350-200 BCE, and contributes much of interest to scholars of Roman history more generally.. Chapter One provides a general introduction to sources and methodology
Fronda rejects such attempts, largely due to the simple fact that not all the allies (not even all the allies in a particular region) rebelled. The book therefore examines in detail both the immediate circumstances and the historical contexts of the revolts of as many individual communities as possible, making a persuasive case that a larger pattern can be found, consisting of a common set of factors, operating differently in different contexts, that can explain both the loyalty of some communities and the disloyalty of others.

The Punic Wars: Points of Diversion [12]

When we wake up every day and look out onto the world, there is an old familiarity that keeps us centered going forward. This can take the form of our daily routines, getting to work having the usual office banter, gym sessions, and evening leisure
Sure it could be minuscule as whether or not to put in that extra overtime at work or major such as investing more into your 401K. Looking back farther, there are instances in history where you could ponder deviation
These points of diversion are certainly fascinating to think about. One such change of events can spark a whole new future for the world as we know it

The Price of Greed: Hannibal’s Betrayal by Carthage [13]

247-183 BCE), the brilliant Carthaginian general of the Second Punic War (218-202 BCE), had the military talent, expertise, and skill to have won the conflict but was denied the resources by his government. The Carthaginian senate repeatedly refused Hannibal’s requests for aid and supplies even as they were relying on him to win the war for them.
275-228 BCE) during the First Punic War (264-241 BCE). Hamilcar had also repeatedly sent word that he required greater support and these pleas were ignored by the elite of the city who preferred to spend the peoples’ tax money on their own luxuries instead of the good of the populace who supported their way of life.
236-183 BCE) at Zama in 202 BCE, he continued to serve Carthage as best he could, acting as the magistrate who oversaw payment of the war indemnity to Rome, and even then he was accused of impropriety and denounced by the elite who valued their own comfort and luxury over the good of the people.. Hannibal’s forces were defeated on the field at the Battle of Zama by Scipio’s brilliant manipulation of the Carthaginian’s own tactics but the groundwork for this defeat was laid throughout the Second Punic War through the Carthaginian government’s refusal to support their general and his troops on campaign in Italy

which conclusion can be drawn about the second punic war from the information in the map?
13 which conclusion can be drawn about the second punic war from the information in the map? Quick Guide

Sources

  1. https://www.neversuchinnocence.com/end-of-the-second-punic-war#:~:text=After%20a%20huge%20defeat%20at,forcing%20them%20to%20partially%20disarm.
  2. https://www.britannica.com/event/Punic-Wars#:~:text=Punic%20Wars%2C%20also%20called%20Carthaginian,hegemony%20over%20the%20western%20Mediterranean.
  3. https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-rome/punic-wars#:~:text=Hannibal’s%20losses%20in%20the%20Second,its%20territory%20in%20North%20Africa.
  4. https://www.britannica.com/event/Punic-Wars
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Punic_War
  6. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antichthon/article/rome-carthage-and-numidia-diplomatic-favouritism-before-the-third-punic-war/929CCC45FF105B9AD50D74C1B699821B
  7. https://www.history.com/topics/ancient-rome/punic-wars
  8. https://history-maps.com/story/Second-Punic-War
  9. https://academic.oup.com/book/11975/chapter/161212031
  10. https://www.academia.edu/12881446/Metaurus_The_Most_Important_Battle_of_the_Second_Punic_War
  11. https://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2011/2011.09.22/
  12. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/punic-wars-points-diversion-gerard-dunne
  13. https://www.worldhistory.org/article/290/the-price-of-greed-hannibals-betrayal-by-carthage/
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